Images of the day

Oct. 27, 2020

Pinelands milkweed is well adapted to the southern pinelands. It grows from a tuber that's up to a foot long and an inch thick. In days of yore, when the regular fires came through, it could quickly send up new shoots. It not only recovered quickly, but it could also outpace much of the competition. Now, it's well suited for roadsides. That's where this one was, blooming outside it's most preferred summer time, probably because it had been mowed. Pinelans milkweed grows in AL, FL, GA, LA, MS, SC, and TN. Polk Co FL, 10/21/15. Dogbane family, Apocynaceae.

Oct. 27, 2020
Oct. 26, 2020

Sometimes the opportunities dictate the image. This one of alp-lilies is something less than ideal. But it was the best available given time and place. If we had been up there on Mt. Evans a few days later, there probably would have been more choices. One recent source calls this Gagea serotina. Don't yet know whether we should be memorializing Lloyd or Gage, or which name will stick. Maybe we should use the Welsh brwynddail y mynydd, if only we knew how to pronounce it. Alp-lily is circumpolar, here occurring in AK, CO, ID, MT, NM, NV, OR, UT, WA, WY, BC, NT and YT. There is a yellow colored variety on two islands on the British Columbian coast. Mt. Evans National Park, Clear Creek Co CO, 6/18/13. Lily family, Liliaceae.

Oct. 26, 2020
Oct. 25, 2020

Hatpins are part of the pipestem family. We've been talking about the compact flower heads of the aster family on blog pages. Asters are not alone with the ability to really pack them in. These little quarter inch heads certainly do too. The individual flowers are only two or three millimeters long. Yellow hatpins grow on naked stems not much more than a foot tall. They appear on relatively open ground where there isn't much competion in AL, FL, GA, MS, NC, and SC. Lowndes Co GA, 7/8/18. Pipestem family, Eriocaulaceae.